Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project

A new alliance of regional water providers have teamed up to initiate the Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project with the capacity to bring raw water from the Trinity River to Lake Houston and the city’s northeast Water Purification Plant. The partners include the City of Houston, North Harris County Regional Water Authority, West Harris County Regional Water Authority, Central Harris County Regional Water Authority, North Fort Bend Water Authority, and the Coastal Water Authority.

https://www.coastalwaterauthority.org/

The Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project is currently projected to cost $351 million.

Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project

Northeast Water Purification Plant Expansion

In anticipation of additional water from the Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project, the regional water authorities and the City of Houston, forged a partnership to accomplish an expansion of the Northeast Water Purification Plant (NEWPP), with each paying it’s fair share of the costs. This multi-billion dollar project, to be completed in phases over the next six to nine years, will increase the treatment capacity from the current 80 million gallons a day, to 400 million gallons a day. The expansion project is considered to be the largest design-build project of it’s kind underway in the US today.

https://greaterhoustonwater.com/

The Northeast Water Purification Plant Expansion project is currently projected to cost $1.973 billion.

Northeast Water Purification Plant Expansion

Surface Water Supply Project

The Surface Water Supply Project water pipeline is a joint project between the North Fort Bend Water Authority and the West Harris County Regional Water Authority carrying much-needed treated surface water from Lake Houston across almost 40 miles of Harris County to water users in the west.

https://www.surfacewatersupplyproject.com/

The Surface Water Supply Project is currently projected to cost $1.236 billion.

Surface Water Supply Project

NFBWA Internal Distribution Lines

Once the treated surface water reaches the NFBWA’s boundaries, the water will be distributed to multiple water plants via internal distribution lines. To meet the increased 2025 conversion requirement, the NFBWA will construct an additional 30 miles of 12 to 60-inch diameter pipeline to deliver the treated surface water to water plants within its boundaries.

The internal distribution lines are currently projected to cost approximately $65 million.